Why I write

Since around age 10, I wanted to be a writer. Even so, I thought I had nothing of interest to write about (which, of course, wasn't true). Rather than share my writing, I kept it all in diaries (journals). After returning to the US from a nine-year experience of living in Europe (in a tiny country called The Netherlands), I went to college and then grad school to earn degrees in English and Creative Writing. I still doubted myself as a writer.

From the heart

I’ve been listening more to what I call my second voice: the one of compassion. My primary voice, the one that does most of the talking internally, is generally filled with criticism and harsh comparing. I no longer want to use or listen to that voice. I’m done with creating guilt and then acting from that emotion. I’d rather act from love and caring about myself and others.

Combatting the dragon

This voice in my head. The one that says I am ridiculous to even consider doing something, the one that doesn’t believe in me, the one that decides it is all not worth it. This voice is the enemy. It’s the voice of shame, of reproach, of disbelief, of fear.

Kill your dreams

There's a well-known piece of advice for writers: "Kill your darlings." It might seem harsh, and killing your dreams may sound terrible. But there's a reason for doing it. What it means is that as a writer, you need to get rid of your most precious and self-indulgent passages for the greater good of your literary work.